Department of Labor Proposes to Increase Minimum Salary for “White Collar” Overtime Exemptions

Tammy McCutchen

April 18, 2019

On March 7, 2019, the Wage and Hour Division of the U.S. Department of Labor, through its Acting Administrator Keith Sonderling, published the long-awaited Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) to revise the “white collar” overtime exemption regulations.

Read this article

DOL Releases a Proposed Rule to Clarify the Types of Compensation in the Overtime Calculation

Tammy McCutchen

April 18, 2019

On March 28, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) released a proposed rule to amend the regulations at 29 CFR Part 778 to clarify and update the “regular rate” requirements under section 7(e) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), 29 USC §207(e), focusing on the types of compensation and benefits that employers must include in the overtime calculation.

Read this article

Qualcomm’s Donald Rosenberg on Regulation and Innovation

April 13, 2019

Donald J. Rosenberg delivered an address last month at the Pepperdine Law Review‘s Symposium, speaking on patent law and the dangers of regulatory capture in the emerging tech sector.

Read this article

The Regulatory Thicket Hurts the Most Vulnerable

Yesim Sayin Taylor

April 12, 2019

For years, the District of Columbia’s main regulatory agency, the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs have resisted reform. D.C. residents will argue about anything, but they are unified in their frustration with this agency: builders complain that permitting takes too long and code inspections are too arbitrary; building tenants complain code violations go unenforced; businesses complain there is too much paperwork required to get up and running; policy experts worry professional licensing disproportionately harms lower-income professionals. The agency’s operations remain stuck in the past, and no administration has managed to significantly reform it.

Read this article

Texas Tech Abandons Racial Preferences in Medical School Admissions

Roger B. Clegg

April 10, 2019

Texas Tech’s medical school recently agreed to stop using racial and ethnic preferences in its admissions.  This came about because of a complaint against Texas Tech filed in 2004 by my organization, the Center for Equal Opportunity, and the ensuing 15-year investigation by the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, headed now under the Trump administration by Ken Marcus.

Read this article

Examining the California Consumer Privacy Act

Matthew R. A. Heiman

April 10, 2019

In a new teleforum, Professor Eric Goldman, Lindsey Tonsager, and moderator Professor Gus Hurwitz discuss the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).

Read this article

Fed ‘Independence’ is a Slippery Slope

Alex J. Pollock

April 5, 2019

In the light of the political reality of Federal Reserve history, a completely independent Fed looks impossible. In the light of the unknowable future, it looks undesirable.

Read this article

The Modern World of Home-Sharing

Christina Sandefur

March 25, 2019

Since our country’s founding, Americans have allowed guests to stay in their homes for short periods of time, often in exchange for doing chores or paying for dinner. Today, technology allows people to do this in ever more efficient ways—to allow guests to rent a room or a house for a week or a night at time.

Read this article

The Many Issues Raised by Senator Warren’s Wealth Tax

J. Kennerly Davis, Jr.

March 12, 2019

A strong argument can be made that Senator Warren’s proposed wealth tax would be unconstitutional unless apportioned.

Read this article

Herring Does Capital

Wayne A. Abernathy

January 31, 2019

Richard J. Herring, professor at the Wharton School, is well known for his insightful commentary on the financial system. His paper on “The Evolving Complexity of Capital Regulation” is a good example of why. Professor Herring presents a readily accessible and remarkably concise history of the development of global standards for bank capital, starting with the first Basel Capital Accord (Basel I—regulators are now looking at the implementation of Basel IV). Then he walks through additions and amplifications under the Dodd-Frank Act and various regulatory innovations, each regulatory round designed to address perceived problems of previous standards.

Read this article